Day Trips From Paris to Impressionist Landscapes

Van Gogh, The Church in Auvers

Van Gogh, The Church in Auvers

Paris in Springtime?

Now is the time to start planning your escape to a springtime in Paris. I have the perfect planner for you: A Guide to The Impressionist Landscape by Patty Lurie.

This wonderful book gives detailed directions for day trips from Paris to the sites of great nineteenth-century paintings. The book is currently out of print, but I had no trouble getting a copy. Many used book stores have copies and buying online is a cinch. I made my purchase from the online retailer Abebooks.

Visit the sites of many beloved Impressionist paintings

The author, a painter herself, painstakingly researched all the site herself. In the Preface she sums up the payback for her hard work:

“No words can describe the experience of seeing the church painted by van Gogh in Auvers or strolling the Pontoise village paths favored by Pissarro. In Moret-sur-Loing, layers of clouds like those studied by Sisley still move quickly overhead, and in Étretat the cliffs painted by almost every Impressionist are just as majestic and awesome.”

Monet, The Railroad Bridge at Argenteuil

Monet, The Railroad Bridge at Argenteuil

 

 

The guide makes it simple to plan your day trips. The tours move around the suburbs of Paris, then to the countryside and the Normandy seacoast. Tour information begins with instructions on your departure from a Paris train station and Lurie gives detailed instructions on how to navigate the public transport systems.

Each tour details paintings done in that area. Specific details for each itinerary include everything you need to get from point A to point B. Not only are there maps, but the book has 112 color illustrations that will provide a visual guide to your discoveries.

The author includes photographs of the current scene for each painting. For many locations the landscape has changed dramatically. For others, like van Gogh’s Church at Auvers, there are few changes. In all instances there is a sense of awe in standing where artists once created immortal images of place.

 

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